About Library - 國立中興大學圖書館 | National Chung Hsing University Library
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:38

University Archives & Special Collections

作者

icon02 University Archives & Special Collections

 

Section Chief Tsai, Tsung-Hsien
Responsibilities
  1. School History Coordination Section.
  2. School History Editing.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 411

 

Administrative Officer Chen, Ying-Lun
Responsibilities
  1. Management and Maintenance of School History and Special Collections' documents.
  2. Institutional Repository and Digital Collections' Promoting Assistant.
  3. School History Editing Assistant.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 412
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:34

Information Systems

作者

icon02 Information Systems

 

Section Chief Huang, Chun-Sheng
Responsibilities
  1. Oversees and coordinates administrative issues of all aspects of the information system.
  2. Manages division budget allocation and resources.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 311

 

Associate Technician Wang, Kuo-Chuan
Responsibilities
  1. Responsible for daliy operation and maintenance of library automatic system.
  2. System analysis and program design.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 313

 

Administrative Clerk Chen, Jian-Jia
Responsibilities
  1. Design, implementation, maintenance, and support for network infrastructure.
  2. Planning, management, and maintenance of computer facilities and equipments.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 322

 

Administrative Clerk Lo, Wei
Responsibilities
  1. Website management.
  2. Conducting Personal Information Management System(PIMS).
Tel +886422840290 ext. 325
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:26

Digital Resources

作者

icon02 Digital Resources

 

Section Chief Kuo, Hui-chen
Responsibilities
  1. Oversees and coordinates administrative issues of all aspects of the digital resources division.
  2. Manages division budget allocation and resources.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 211

 

Executive Officer Hsiao, Li-Chiung
Responsibilities
  1. Facilitates acquisition and management of e-journal packages (ACM、ACS、SCIENCE、APS、AIP、RSC、IOP、JSTOR and IEL ).
  2. Provides open access journal services.
  3. Compiles statistics for e-journal collection.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 218

 

Officer Tseng, Hui-Fen
Responsibilities
  1. Conducts and maintain NCHU core journals plans.
  2. Facilitates acquisition and management of e-journal packages (SDOL, Nature, Oxford and Cell Press).
  3. Manages the expenditures and plan budgets of core journals.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 212

 

Officer Lai, Lee-Ming
Responsibilities
  1. Plan and execute marketing plans for promoting NCHU Press publications, including joining the League of National University Presses, as well as participating in international book affairs.
  2. Manages the publication sales, accounting and inventory.
  3. Coordinates materials from the physical and online sales channels to ensure proper placement.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 215

 

Officer Fang, Kuang-Chien
Responsibilities
  1. Manages Chinese print journals collection (check-in, claiming, binding, etc.).
  2. Facilitates acquisition and management of Chinese journal collection (print journals, e-journal packages, newspaper, etc.).
  3. Managing 3F reading space, periodical stacks, and Newspaper area.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 217

 

Administrative Officer Chen, Yi-Yi
Responsibilities
  1. Manages Western, Japanese, and Korean print journals collection (check-in, claiming, binding, etc.).
  2. Facilitates acquisition and management of e-journal packages (EBSCO ASP+BSP, Project Muse and Emerald).
  3. Managing 2F reading space, periodical stacks, and Reading WOW area.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 216
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:19

Reference Services

作者

icon02 Reference Services

 

Section Chief Wang, Chun-Hsiang
Responsibilities
  1. Oversees and coordinates administrative issues of all aspects of the reference division.
  2. Manages division budget allocation and resources.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 140

 

Secretary Chen, Jung-Jung
Responsibilities
  1. Database Purchasing.
  2. Subject Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 143

 

Officer Liu, Yi-Chun
Responsibilities
  1. Reference Desk Management.
  2. Subject Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 148

 

Officer Tsou, Ching-Fen
Responsibilities
  1. Interlibrary Loan Service.
  2. Subject Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 141

 

Administrative Officer Jiang, Jia-Jing
Responsibilities
  1. Electronic Thesis & Dissertations Service System (ETDS) Management.
  2. Subject Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 146

 

Administrative Clerk Pan, Sz-Hua
Responsibilities
  1. Promotional Activities Planning and Management.
  2. Subject Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 147
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:13

Collection Management & Circulation Services

作者

icon02 Collection Management & Circulation Services

 

Section Chief Li, Li-Mei
Responsibilities
  1. Supervising and coordinating all business in the Collection & Circulation Section.
  2. Handling official documents of Collection & Circulation Section.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 460

 

Specialist Chou, Hui-Ting
Responsibilities
  1. Managing 4-6 floor stacks.
  2. Volunteer management.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 462

 

Officer Lee, Su-Lin
Responsibilities
  1. Managing the group study room and individual research room.
  2. Managing B1 learning commons and individual study room.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 469

 

Officer Hwu, Ying-Chung
Responsibilities
  1. Conducting 3F multimedia center service.
  2. Managing Audio-visual collection.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 468

 

Administrative Clerk Liu, Chun-Hung
Responsibilities
  1. Managing Interlibrary Loan Service.
  2. Conducting 3F Audio-visual working space services.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 463

 

Officer Huang, Chun-Huei
Responsibilities Conducting circulation services.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 467

 

Assistant Chen, Jing-Xun
Responsibilities Managing TAEBDC project business.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 466
週二, 20 八月 2019 16:04

Acquisitions & Cataloging

作者

icon02 Acquisitions & Cataloging

 

Section Chief Chung, Hsing-Fen
Responsibilities Comprehensive management of the division business.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 121

 

Administrative Officer Chang, Wen-chih
Responsibilities
  1. Acquisition of materials in Western language.
  2. Acceptance for gift books in Western language.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 122

 

Administrative Officer Chang, Wan-Jen
Responsibilities
  1. Cataloging and classification of materials in Western language.
  2. Acquisition, cataloging, and maintenance of all kind of E-books.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 126

 

Officer Lee, Meng-Lan
Responsibilities
  1. Acquisition of materials in Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages for main library.
  2. Accession number management.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 124

 

Officer Liu, Hui-Chen
Responsibilities
  1. Cataloging and classification of materials in Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages for main library.
  2. Bibliographic data transmission to NCL.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 127

 

Administrative Clerk Lin, Yu-Pei
Responsibilities
  1. Cataloging and classification of materials in Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages for academic and administrative units.
  2. Review and cataloging of NCHU Electronic Thesis & Dissertations.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 125

 

Administrative Clerk Wang, Su-Chan
Responsibilities
  1. Acceptance and planning for gifts and exchanges.
  2. Cataloging of gift books in Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 128
週二, 20 八月 2019 15:01

Office of the University Librarian

作者

icon02 Office of the University Librarian

 

University Librarian Lin, Woei
Responsibilities Comprehensive management and supervision for all aspects of the library.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 111

 

Associate University Librarian Kuo, June-Jei
Responsibilities Assistance with the library affairs under the direction of the University Librarian.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 117

 

Executive Officer Chen, Chia-Chi
Responsibilities
  1. Overall support for the operation of the University Librarian's Office.
  2. Handling the administrative tasks of personnel matters.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 112

 

Administrative Officer Position to be Filled
Responsibilities
  1. Fiscal management & budgetary control.
  2. Official Document Management.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 113

 

Administrative Clerk Yang, Shu-cheng
Responsibilities
  1. Comprehensive maintenance of the building and facilities.
  2. Meeting/conference room Management.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 114

 

Affairs Assistant Yang, Ying-lin
Responsibilities
  1. Cleaning and maintenance management.
  2. Booking coordination for meeting/conference rooms.
  3. Delivery of documents, letters & packages.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 115

 

Maintenance Worker Chiou, Tung-liang
Responsibilities
  1. Building & utilities maintenance.
  2. Routine inspections and basic repairs of library facilities.
  3. Support for document delivery requests.
Tel +886422840290 ext. 100
週三, 29 十一月 2017 17:44

A Story of NCHU Library-Vigo

作者

A Story of NCHU Library

  – The Amazing Life of a Table Named Vigo

    一個中興大學圖書館的故事–威哥的奇幻桌生

 

Dedicated to NCHU Library staff who had been through the 921 Earthquake together  

 

The Meniki Tree

F-1
Figure 1. Vigo – the towering Meniki tree.

  My name is Vigo. I am here to tell you a story about a table and a library. My life began with a tiny seed of Meniki (Taiwanese red cypress). Carried by wind, one day I dropped to the ground near a giant fellow downed by a bolt in a stormy evening. With the open space left by the fallen giant, I was shined by sunlight and soon a sprout burst out. This was 1796, the year the aging Emperor Chien-Lung (乾隆) passed the crown to his son Chia-Ching (嘉慶). I found myself taking root in a deep valley of Mountain So-Chen (守城大山) shrouded by mist and cloud all year round. The mountain, a century and half later, became part of Huei-Sun Forest (惠蓀林場), an affiliation of Chun-Hsing Univerversity (中興大學). Two hundred years ago, Mountain So-Chen remained as a virgin forest with lush-green and tall conifers. It was so quiet that one could only hear wind whispering and streams running. What I enjoyed most was moisture and cool air brought in by east wind from the Pacific Ocean. I soaked in mountain dew in the morning and bathed in brief golden sun at noon. I still remember vividly the tranquility and languor I had before. Life like this went on for 150 years. I became a towering tree with shining scaly leaves and thick fibrous brown bark, 30 meters high and 150 centimeters across. I was a healthy Meniki tree standing tall in a valley of Mountain So-Chen. (Fig. 1)

F-2
Figure 2. Site of past Taiwood (台木公司) on Nan-Men Road (南門路). Now it becomes an empty lot where many mango trees grow.

  But my peaceful life soon came to an end. In an early spring morning of 1954, a group of loggers with chainsaws appeared on the edge of the forest. A brutal clear-cut began without mercy. All Meniki trees in the valley were felled and topped at the stump. No one was spared. We were loaded on trucks and transported to a sawmill called Taiwood (台木公司) on Nan-Men Road (南門路) in Taichung city. (Fig. 2)

F-3
Figure 3. Vigo just finished – the study table with 2-bar linkage as foot rest. The top board is a single piece of solid-wood Meniki. The count of year rings exceeds 160.

Firstly, I was sliced into thick, flat planks. After that, I was trimmed squarely and became a board of 180cm long, 90cm wide and 5cm thick. Then four legs were added down below. They were connected by two linkage bars as foot rest. (Fig. 3) Until now, this remains the most distinguished feature of mine. I began to take shape of a table. Finally, I was polished and painted with clear, glossy lacquer. I was made a glittering solid-wood study table.

 

The Young Provincial College

F-4
Figure 4. Library of Provincial College of Agriculture in 1954. Palm trees were just planted.

  One day, in a short drive I was shipped to a two-floor building. It was a newly completed library of Taiwan Provincial College of Agriculture (臺灣省立農學院). (Fig. 4)

F-5
Figure 5. Diligent students studying in library in 1950s. Each table typically seated four students.

In fact, this college was just one block away from Taiwood. It was worth mentioning that the library was the first and tallest reinforced-concrete building on campus at the time. Along with other tables, I was moved and placed in a study room on the 2nd floor. From then on, I served as a table with four chairs for students to study and do homework before and after class. (Fig. 5)

F-6
Figure 6. Rice paddy in 1950s around site of the current NCHU library.

In 1954, the provincial college had a rather small campus, compared with the present one, spanning east-to-west from Kuo-Guan Road (國光路) to the famous Palm Road (椰林路) and north-to-south from Hsin-Da Road (興大路) to Zhon-Min South Road (忠明南路). Kuo-Guan Road (國光路) and Zhon-Min South Road (忠明南路) actually were not developed yet. The college was surrounded by immense rice paddies, vegetable fields and fish ponds. Later on, some place there became the site of the present library. (Fig. 6)

F-7
Figure 7. Track field in foreground and library in background. Years later they became neighbors again in the southwestern campus.

Buildings and classrooms scattered mainly along Palm Road. The library faced eastward and was located in the southwestern corner of Palm Road and Da-Shuei Road (大學路). This is exactly the location of the Science Building at present. Across Palm Road was my obstreperous neighbor, track field, where students played sports. (Fig. 7) Now stands the Building of Civil and Environment Engineering.

F-8
Figure 8. Library in the evening – the brightest building on campus in 1950s.

  In 1954, the provincial college had a faculty of 113 instructors at all ranks and estimated 1000 students in 5 departments. Students’ spirit was impressively high in spite of poor material living standards in the 1950s. They were inquisitive and hardworking. Students lined up for reservation at the front door before it was open in the morning. Almost every one of the 320 seats was taken at all times. In the evening the library became the brightest building on campus. (Fig. 8)

F-9
Figure 9. Three-floor annex on the north side of the original library.

In the early 1960s, the postwar baby-boomer generation reached the age for college. The provincial college became a provincial university with 3 colleges in 1961. The name of Chun-Hsing Univerversity (中興大學) was officially coined. The university started to extend its campus westwards through several claims of eminent domain. It acquired land that used to be rice fields and fish ponds. Campus was quickly doubled, and incessant developments were made since then. Student enrollments soon exceeded 1700 in 13 departments on the main campus. To meet the ever increasing demand of space, the university added a three-floor annex on the north side of its original building in an L arrangement. (Fig. 9) All wood furniture were renovated and painted. On the opening day of the annex, I wore fresh dark brown paint to welcome students.

 

The Bowl and Closet

F-10
Figure 10. The majestic Bowl and Closet before 921 Earthquake. But on the day of the earthquake, water towers on roof were toppled. Water spilled out and gushed down through cracks on sidewalls like waterfall. The basement instantly became a swimming pool.

  Explosion of student enrollments inexorably led to the need of a new, spacious library. Land on the south shore of Chung-Hsin Lake (中興湖) was chosen as the construction site. The new library building was completed in 1980. And it quickly became the landmark of the university. The building was a complex comprising three sections: a four-floor, bowl-shaped structure for study rooms in the east, a tall rectangular tower for book storage in the west, and a connection structure in between. (Fig. 10)

F-11
Figure 11. Plywood tables and chairs in the Bowl and Closet. These tables and chairs are extremely sturdy. Their toughness was tested and proved 100% quake-resistance.

This unique feature in outlook soon lent the building to a nickname for Bowl and Water Closet. Not reverent but amiable in a sense. The bowl provided a capacity of 1000 seats, solving the long-term space problem of the library.The tower was a huge concrete structure in exterior that enclosed a stack of 7 floors built inside independently, each with steel plates juxtaposed in rows. An upper floor was stacked on the lower one with steel columns for the upright support, floor by floor. This fatal design, 19 years later, contributed to the disastrous destruction of itself in the 921 earthquake. Shortly we all moved into the new building, and I still served as a study table. One day many long tables arrived. They were new study tables in place of us. Alas! My miserable life began from then on. These tables were made of plywood with two flat supports down under. (Fig. 11) They were painted light tan and had a hard vinyl table top. These tables came with chairs that looked odd. Each chair was made of a single piece of thick plywood bent in an “ㄣ” (pronounced as an) shape. They were really one of the kind! However, no one recognized me – beneath the thick brown paint, I was a genuine solid-wood Meniki table – and I was moved down to the basement. This place was a big garage, and I became a stock table there.

  In 1971, the university turned into a national university, and it reached a size of 3172 students and 684 faculty members in 23 departments. As time went by, library staff piled stuff of all kinds upon me: outdated newspaper, broken chairs, even wok and stove, anything you can think of. At one time, believe it or not, I became home and playground of a cat family with kittens hopping around. In the late spring of 1999, the library was infested with flea carried in most likely by these stray cats. Notice that, my fellow, flea also climbs stairs. The curator ferreted out and tracked all the way down to the basement. By accident he saw me buried overwhelmingly by the stuff like a hill. After scratching off some paint and smelling the wood, he immediately found my identity: a Meniki table. I was extricated from a miserable life of approximately 18 years. Soon I was shipped to a workshop where a carpenter scraped off the worn-out dark paint. I was polished and painted with clear, glossy lacquer again. I regained the elegant, radiant mien I had 40 years ago. One day I overheard a plan of putting me in a corner of the bowl for exhibition as an antique. I was so delighted that I could hardly wait for that moment to come.

 

The Quake

F-12
Figure 12. Librarians awaiting at front door right before aftershock of magnitude 6.8. Minutes later the aftershock struck. Debris fell down like shower from the building behind them.

  On September 21 in 1999, an earthquake of magnitude 7.3 hit hard in the central Taiwan area after midnight. This changed the course of my life again. The library itself suffered severe damage like many other buildings on campus. In the morning, library staff gathered together around the main entrance, waiting for assignment on cleaning up the mess. (Fig. 12)

F-13
Figure 13. Librarians cleaning up the mess. Offices of all units were moved to the ground floor of the Bowl. It suffered the least damage during the earthquake.

All of a sudden, an aftershock of magnitude 6.8 struck. The earth initially shook up and down, then side to side in various directions. Jolts lasted for about 5 minutes. Staff members were shocked and ran wild to take cover. They witnessed two spectacular but terrifying scenes they never saw before. The three structures, especially the tower and the tallest, swayed violently left and right and bumped each other repeatedly with horrible cracking sound. Debris started to fall. This was because the three structures – the tower and the bowl as well as the middle section – were all at different heights. When the earth started to shake, the three structures swung at different paces, and they furiously rammed each other with tremendous impact on sidewalls. Worst of all, inside the tower,

F-14
Figure 14. Ceiling on the 4th floor dropped and littered as if being bombed. Since then it was closed and never open again.
F-15
Figure 15. Pillar cross cracked. The crack was so deep that one could almost see through it. Cement was fragmented, and it could be easily peeled off.

the stack of steel-plate floors loading with hefty books on shelves wobbled like colossal jello. This exacerbated the swing of the tower. The second scene was that water in Chung-Hsin Lake was excited back and forth, and in a few seconds long waves formed and swept ashore. Throughout the day, tremors continued to occur but decreased in magnitude and frequency. By dawn on the next day, it began to calm down. Library staff showed up at eight o’clock sharp as usual. No one was absent. They entered the building to remove debris and sort things out. (Fig. 13) They found walls broken, ceiling dropped and pillars cracked. (Figs. 14&15) The library looked like a ruin. To their surprise, the main structure of the bowl remained intact. But the tower was completely destroyed. All the pillars were cross cracked at the bottom. Fissures appeared in zigzags all over the concrete walls. As for me, luckily I stayed in Curator’s office that night and survived without even a single scratch.

 

The Rebuild and Reunion

F-16_1
Figure 16-1. Man belt stretching from the ruined library to Huei-Sun Auditorium. Volunteers included mainly students, staff and faculty.
F-16_2
Figure 16-2. President Chen-Chang Lee passing the first bundle. He led the university through the toughest time of recovery while morale was at the lowest level.
F-17
Figure 17. Temporary branch library at Agronomy Building. Vigo stayed there for about 5 years before it moved back to the new library.

  Waiting in no time, the university launched a series of restoration acts. Administrative and academic activities resumed. Damaged buildings started to repair. Library staff temporarily moved to the bowl. In just a few days, all units of the library began to function normally. However, two of the three structures, except the bowl, were seriously damaged. The university president ultimately decided to rebuild the library. Reconstruction of the library began with evacuation of books and materials to five different locations around campus. Among the events of evacuation is the notable “man belt” taking place on March 9, 2000. Approximately 1500 volunteers of students, faculty and staff were organized. They lined up in two lanes, relaying books from the ruined library to the Huei-Sun Auditorium (惠蓀堂). (Fig. 16) After that, one day the curator left and assumed a different position somewhere else. I did not see him since then. I was moved to the 1st floor in the Agronomy Building (農藝系館) as a temporary branch library. (Fig. 17) It was a dark, humid place surrounded by thick vegetation. The building received little sun even at noon. Lights were too dim to read by. There I became a study table again, but no one ever paid attention to me in such a gloomy atmosphere.

F-18
Figure 18. NCHU library luminescent as dusk falls. The hardship of Vigo’s past faded away just like sunset.

  Six years elapsed quickly, and the new library building, the present one, was finally completed in 2005. This is a seven-floor structure with lots of wide glass windows. (Fig. 18)

F-19
Figure 19. Study room with fashionable furniture and digital facilities.
F-20
Figure 20. Lazy-bone Hollow where students in reading postures at their disposal. This is such a cozy place that students easily fall asleep in the afternoon. They are in sharp contrast to the students shown in Figure 5.

It has a space three times that of the Bowl and Closet, providing 1500 seats and many trendy facilities. (Figs 19&20) A week before the grand opening, I was moved back to the new building. I eagerly anticipated to get in place and to serve as a study table again. But I saw an army of brand-new, stylish tables already upholding every corner of the library, from the bottom floor to the top floor. There is no room for me. I ended up with seating in a remote aisle somewhere on the 4th floor. From then on I became an art workbench. Another 12 years flew by. I bore countless cuts, scratches, and paste patches on my back. One day, the long-gone curator returned, and he spotted me standing sadly in the dark aisle. The course of my life was changed one more time. I was renovated by the same carpenter I encountered 18 years ago. After being polished and painted, I become a luminous, radiant table but only for exhibition this time. (Fig. 21) My dear fellow! Come visit me in the designated exhibition area on the 4th floor of the library. Let me tell you more stories about the library and, of course, myself – once a giant Meniki tree, a study table, a stock table, an art workbench, now an exhibition table and a veteran.

F-21
Figure 21. Vigo – an exhibition table now. Poster on the wall shows 2 students discussing on Vigo about 50 years ago. Notice the wood attached to the short bar between the two legs in the left. The short bar was actually broken for unknown reasons. It is supported bottom-up by the wood. This marks the deep wound Vigo suffered in the past.


 

 

APPENDIX – A Brief History of NCHU Library before Provincial College

  The NCHU history can be traced back to the Japanese-occupied era from 1919 to 1945. In the beginning, the colonial government in Taiwan founded Taiwan Gubernatorial High School of Agriculture and Forestry (臺灣總督府農林專門學校) in Taipei. This was the predecessor of the NCHU. The Taichung campus in Chiaozi-Tou (橋子頭) was developed in 1943. The school was moved to the new campus in October of the year. A library was formally established. It was located in the house next to the Little Auditorium (小禮堂) at the end of Palm Road. (Fig. A-1) It dwelled on a lot of 590 square meters. This was the origin of the NCHU library. In 1945, Japanese left and the school was renamed Taiwan Provincial Taichung Technical Institute of Agriculture (臺灣省立臺中農業專科學校). Next year the institute changed its name to Taiwan Provincial College of Agriculture (臺灣省立農學院). Two more library branches were installed at Department of Agricultural Economics and Department of Forestry, respectively. At that time, it collected 27,000 volumes mainly on agriculture and other related areas.

A-1
Figure A-1. First library in NCHU history – house at right of Little Auditorium. Both were ruined by the notorious 921 earthquake. At present, the Little Auditorium is actually a replica enlarged by 20%. The house was simply demolished and removed.
週三, 29 七月 2015 14:36

Vision

作者

★Vision

To provide exemplary library services and help NCHU gain more international recognition.

 

★Mission

  • To create a safe and enjoyable learning and working environment.

  • To oversee the university collections and resources and ensure accessibility.

  • To provide cross-platform services that satisfy the learning, research and teaching needs of NCHU faculty and students.



★Values

1. Enthusiasm

 (1) Every library patron is unique and important.

 (2) Accommodate the needs of our patrons.

 (3) Provide a comfortable, friendly, and safe learning environment that stimulates creativity, liveliness, and collaboration.

2. Professionalism

 (1) Provide outstanding services using the best resources.

 (2) Employ talented and promising individuals.

 (3) Support the growth of individuals and the institution.

 (4) Exceed the expectations of library patrons.

3. Efficiency

 (1) Have a clear and concise workflow, and to ensure a proper execution of the tasks.

 (2) Provide prompt solutions to the problems of library patrons.

 (3) Balance work-life stress through good time management and proper planning and review.

 (4) Communicate effectively.

 (5) Complete tasks using the appropriate tools or resources.

4.Freedom of Thought

 (1) Treat each library patron with the same level of care and respect.

 (2) Foster open-mindedness and acceptance of new ideas.

 (3) Treat others with empathy.

 (4) Create a diverse and multicultural environment.

 (5) Protect the privacy of library patrons.



★Goals

1. To build a library collection and tools that fit the needs of library patrons.

2. To create a cross-platform Web service that allows easy access to information.

3. To ensure that all data are saved and stored properly.

4. To understand and predict the research, teaching, and learning needs of library patrons.

5. To improve the information literacy of library patrons.

6. To create an environment that is suitable for learning, teaching, and research.

7. To be open to change, embrace diversity, and encourage creativity.

8. To encourage the professional growth of library staff.

9. To facilitate the integration of information and knowledge by collaborating with government agencies, academic institutions, and the industry.

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